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Published by the student body of Atlantic Christian 
College with Betty Miller and fiatherine Lewis as 
co-editors and Margaret Farmer as business manager 

At&3? 

(943 



ree 



Atlantic Christian College Library 

Wilson, N. C. 





HEY S H 
THE LIGH 



September seventh — and school not quite as^ 
usual. The girls were in the Boys' Dormitory/and 
the boys — well, many of them were/in Uncle 
Sam's Army and Navy. The enrollment was up 



to par, though; and no girl suffered a 
shortage. The boys who had left came bacA to 
see us in those eye-catching uniforms, ^snd we 
all felt a burst of pride that these/were the 





same bays with whom we had worked or studied 
or pLayed. We had long been conscious of the 
war, of course; but somehow it became more of 
a reality during the fall and winter. Chapel 
speeches — cotton picking — blackouts — First Aid 
courses — sugar cards — bones cracking after cal- 
isthenics — mid-term graduation — eleven o'clock 
curfew — reservists hiking at dawn — 18 year-olds 
registering — insignias sprouting on the girls' 
coats — fadeout of intercollegiate athletics — dis- 
cussion of campaigns — letters to camps and to 
foreign spots — yes, we felt it, Atlantic Christian 
College in a world at war. 

During the past several months, those erf our 
boys who had not previously registered did so, 



and they will be in the various branches of the 
service — on the land, in the air, on the seas — 
doing their bit to preserve for our country all 
the principles of democracy about which they 
have learned at Atlantic Christian College. 

Our hearts are with the boys who have gone 
out from Atlantic Christian College. It is to 
them that we would dedicate this book. It is 
our most earnest hope that they and we may 
have a part in building a World of the Future in 
which never again will young men be called 
away from the schools and colleges to take up 
arms; a world in which people everywhere may 
live peacefully under principles of Justice, 
security, and responsible freedom. 



<±2056 



CONSTITUENCY PICTURED, PRAISED 

AND RAGGED 



39TH SESSION 




1VD don't blame us if yon look or 



sound ridiculous— Remember we only wrote and snapped what we saw. 



We weren't trying to revolutionize or set the 
world on fire by making this annual different. 
How much sleep we lost or how many classes 
we cut to do it and to give you this log of your 



'42-'43 college year is a mere nothing now. 
Appreciation especially to Dr. Workman who 
could always spend an hour on a shot and 
without whom we'd have been lost. 




^J-re5nmen f^oodt J*wi 



ere 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2012 with funding from 

University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill 



http://archive.org/details/pineknot1943atla 



CAMPUS TURNS GREEN 

WITH FRESHMAN 

ARRIVAL 




HERE are you from? You are? 



Well, da you know so and so from there? I met him at such and such. 



Where's the dean's office? Can she tell me 
where my room is? Who's my roommate? 
Questions-Questions . . . Freshmen trying to 
fade their greenness before the upperclassmen 
arrive. They go through the process of registra- 



tion without the least idea of what they're doing 
or taking. They struggle through the week with 
many a blunder, then the upperclassmen arrive 
to torment and tease them. Longingly they look 
at the family picture and sigh, "Home was never 
like this." 



V- 



'ood morning, Mrs. Blankety-Blank. 
Yes, indeed, we'll take care of little 
Susie, and Mr. Jarman will, personally, 
wash between Johnny's toes! Oh, how do 
you do, Mr. Whatsit. Janey doesn't like 
her bed? Well, well, we shall see what 
we can do about getting her a Beauty- 
Rest mattress. Yes, Mary. No, Ginny. 
Yes, Dot. No, no, no, no." 

Miss Whitley has a word for it on Reg- 
istration Day. We haven't asked her what 




Mr. Five by Five. 



the word is. But she is smiling and pa- 
tient, and so is Mr. Jarman. If we wanted 
to sound cynical, we'd say they just don't 




Check and double-check. 

know what lies ahead. We hear they are 
collaborating on a book entitled "The Des- 
perate Destiny of Deans." Still, if we had 
an "after" picture, we could prove that 
they were smiling in June even as in 
September. 

We've thought up a new one for Mr. 
Case as he steered you through the maze 
of registration. He should be called Pivo- 
tal Perry. Everything revolving about him, 
Mr. Case smiles on, giving a twist to that 
unruly lock in center-back, and for the 
thirty-ninth time puts his Stoo-dents on 
the beam. 



c 10 j 



For registration headaches, you got 
your pink pills and aspirin from Mrs. Wil- 
son. You took these with a dope from the 
Campus Store before you went to the Din- 
ing Hall, where Mrs. Charles showed you 
all the latest wrinkles in cabbage and 
sweet potatoes. 

Next, you went to see Mildred. We 
don't need to tell you why. If Mildred 
could only ride a bike as successfully as 
she rakes in the bucks! 

Toward the end of the day you sneaked 
into the library to — no, not to look at the 
books. You went to pick out your spot 




Food equals pills department. 

for that evening rendezvous with the 
"higher education." Later, though, when 
you did have to study that one time, Miss 
Fleming and Miss Myrtie were glad to 
help you find — no, not the spot under the 
dimmest light. The books, of course. No 
kidding, though, our problems are made 
easier every year by the friendliness of 
our deans, our registrar, our nurse, dieti- 
tian and librarians. 




Want your information 
now? 



[11] 




"Ahem, the students in Psychawlogy 
will please number themselves from one 
to 30." Do you remember how you felt 
the first time you finished writing part 
86 of question 17 on the Psychology 
test? Well, it was good training for the 
army! 

And Mr. Hamlin saying, "Sh, sh, sh," 
and passing out free pamphlets to his 
dumplings. We have him and Dr. 
Workman to thank for our broadened 
interest in world affairs. 

Will you ever forget that stampede 
of girls to Mr. Grove's music classes? 
Well, we enjoyed them, even after he 
got married. 

Miss Nackos has helped put the 
Collegiate in the groove. But it took 
Miss Eliason to show us when dogs are 
"news." The girls think Gregor should 
be a faculty member next year. Did 
you go to Miss Stagg's tri-lingual tea, 
and "avez-vous perdu votre umbrella?" 
We wd 
vamos, 
cucurafi 

Whe 



[12] 



"Hank" Hodges brings us back to earth with a 
desk-side chat on dirt-farming in Mississippi. 

Our coaches are good sports and fine coaches. 
Nuff said! Mr. Hough and Mrs. Eicher are off- 
campus, but the practice-teachers say they're 
tops. They had better say so! 

Butch is a bit backward, as you can see. You 
wouldn't have guessed it, would you? If anybody 
could square a circle, Mr. Smith could-and-in 
French, German, Russian, and Hebrew. We were 
sorry to see him go. 

"You-all oughta eat molasses and corn-bread. 
It'll make men of you." Well, Mr. Waters, it 
looks as if everybody will have a chance to try 
it now. 

What would chapel be without "Fonny" wav- 
ing the baton, or without Miss Peele's post- 
mortems on the speakers? And last but not 
least, there is Mrs. Baggette's motherly smile 
for us. 





[13] 



Way back in 1920 A.D. Charlie and 
Dr. Hilley arrived on the campus. Since 
then Dr. Hilley has given his All to run- 
ning the college, and Charlie has given his 
All to running the furnace and everything 
else. Dr. Hilley has done a wonderful job 
and we take our hats off to him (which is 



more than he can do since he never wears 
one.) His whistle — one short and one 
long — from the office steps always brings 
someone on the run. We've never known 
him to fail to remember a returning stu- 
dent no matter what class. 




This man, President 
H. S. Hilley, alias 
"Ca n n o n b a I I," is 
wanted for having a 
wonderful executive 
ability. 



[14] 




A real "bored" meeting. 



EXECUTIVE BOARD 
THIS IS IT 



^_Jh 



he high muckety-mucks — in whose hands lies 
the fate of folks like you and me. These are the 
people on whom falls the blame when things go 
wrong and who are overlooked when praises are 
sung — when and if. We of the "Pine Knot" staff 
have a kindly feeling toward them, for they have 
struggled with us and have mortgaged their pos- 
sessions in order that we might have an annual. 
Yep, that's what's happening to Mr. Jarman's 
hair — haven't you noticed how thin it's getting? 
They struggle with things financial and disci- 
plinary — the financial struggling is bad enough, 




Hoigh Toiders — both. 

but they particularly dislike the disciplinary cases 
— much more than the students "on the carpet." 
Blake was prexy, but he was graduated and the 
Navy called; Lib "Todos" Browning took over the 
governing reins and she reigned well. They're 
all really nice people, though. 



[15] 




The little girls who're always there. 



The little men who were never 
there. 




DDRMITDRY C D U IV C I L 



-y 



ipe! I'd better hide myself under 
the wing of the good ol' Oasis, be- 
cause Council meets tonight." That's the 
way it sounds in Kinsey and Caldwell on 



Wednesday night. And two new deans 
— they've had their say, too. But what's 
a rule? 



[16] 




Do as I say — not as I do. 



SUPERVISORS RD ARE 



+^rsTe 



"enry Walters thought he could 
pull strings instead of pushing a yard 
broom — after all the "boss," Jack Martin, 
comes from Jamesville, too. But Jack 
fooled him! Dishes and scraps seem to 
move out almost by themselves in the din- 
ing hall — the haven of no confusion after 
meals. But let Earle Williams tell you how 
"easy" it is to get girls to stay on duty 
during week-ends. 

How many times a week does it have to 



be fixed? That light cord in Room 6 can 
drive a man mad — that's where Billie Ad- 
ams went when everyone thought he left 
for the Air Corps. But then the Super- 
visors' Board must have some troubles, 
too. 

And they have them when someone 
cuts work, or tries to get lazy on them. 
Mrs. Charles is there to be sure that Nan- 
nie Blanche doesn't forget anyone — as if 
she would. 



[17] 




Going? You just came! 



FRESHMAN CLASS OFFICERS 



J. 



n the face of '42 these raw 
recruits enlisted to do their part 
for Alma-Mater. They chose as 
their leaders Dot Greene, Tal- 
madge Narron, Julia Gliarmis, and 
Vivian Denning. We hereby dedi- 
cate to them this poem: 




With the spring of '43 we see 
them emerge from their nine 
months of basic training no longer 
scared and no longer green. Why, 
just think, next year they will 
be seasoned sophomores endowed 
with the traditional wisdom that all 
sophomores possess! 



Here are the freshy freshmen 
Who once were green but growing, 
They do their work with might and main 
Their minds with wisdom stowing. 



[18] 




EDNA ASKEW 

FANNIE BELLE BARBER 

CHRISTINE BARFIELD 

M MARIE BARNES 

MARIE H. BARNES 

MARY ELIZABETH BARRETT 

VIRGINIA DARE BARWICK 
KATHERINE BENSON 
ANN BEST 

EVELYN BOYETTE 

LOUISE BOYKIN 

MARGARET BRITTAIN 

STEPHEN BUGHER 

B. G. BUNN, JR. 

RUTH BUNTING 

ELIZABETH CASPER 
DORIS COLE 

MARGIE CRAWLEY 

DORIS CROCKER 

BLANCHE DAWSON 

VIVIAN DENNING 
MABEL DODD 

JOHN DRIVER 

REBA DRIVER 

DOCK EDGERTON 

LEE EDMUNDSON 

LEWIS FARMER 

ALEC FLOWERS 

MARY FLOWERS 

DOROTHY FREEMAN 

JEAN FRITZ 

CORNELIA GARNER 

JULIA GLIARMIS 

LULA PURVIS GRAY 

DOROTHY GREENE 

BRYAN HAISLIP 

HAROLD HARDISON 

RUTH LEWIS HARRELL 
LA RUE HEMBY 

BARBARA HICKS 



F R E S H M E 
19 4 3 



IV 



C19] 




FRESHMEN 
19 4 3 



PUINCEY HILL 

PEGGY HOLTON 

BERNICE HOOD 

ARLENE HUMPHRY 

E5TELLE HYMAN 

MERLE JACKSON 

ELEANOR JONES 
FLORA JONES 

RACHEL JONES 

MARY ALICE KENDALL 

HARRY LAING 
ELSIE LAMM 

MARJORIE LAMM 
VELVA LAMM 

VERNA LEE LAMM 

IRENE LASSITER 

JAMES LAWSON 
LOIS LONG 

WILLIAM MAY 

MARY McDANIEL 

EVELYN MEDLIN 
JAMES METTS 

ROSALYN MIZELLE 
MARY MOYE 

MILDRED MOYE 

MARTHE MYERS 

TALMADGE NARRON 

BETTY NETHERCUTT 
JOSEPH OWENS 

HELEN PARKER 

JAMES PEARCE 

MADELINE PIERCE 

SANFORD PITTMAN 
EUNICE POPE 

MAXINE POWELL 

CAROLYN PRATT 

WADE PRIDGEN 

ADELYN PROCTOR 

CLYDA RENFROW 

AVIS LEE RHODES 




[20] 




CALVIN RICE 

RICHARD RICKS 

PERCY RIGGAN 

GLADYS ROEBUCK 

EDNA ROWLAND 

ELI SALEEBY 

OPAL LEE SATTERFIELD 
BILL SERMONS 

WILLIAM SHIVAR 

CLARIS SMITH 

ROBERT SMITH 

PENELOPE SOUFAS 

ELIZABETH STALLINGS 
DORIS STANELY 

DALTON STEPHENSON 

RUBY STEPHENSON 

LEON STURGEON 
SUDIE TART 

ELLA NORA THOMPSON 
JESSIE TURNER 

J P. TYNDALL 

GLADYS VAUSE 
GENE VICK 

MARGARET LEE WALKER 

GERALDINE WARREN 

M. A. WARWICK 
EDNA WATERS 

MARY WILLIAMS 

BLANCHE WILLIFORD 
CLARA WHITE 

EDNA EARLE WHITEHURST 
LOLA WHITLEY 

DORIS WOODARD 

A. C. YOUNG 



FRESHMEN 
13 4 3 



[21] 




Front, back, or middle? 



Intelligence Readily Circulated. 



l /ope, sorry, no dance — just the mar- 
shals all dressed up and nowhere to go. 
You've seen them shoveling out programs 
in Howard Chapel. Frances Sermons is 
chief marshal. We've observed that one 



MARSHALS 



"Senor" Chapin has developed an interest 
in concerts unheard of for Howard — Well, 
yes — it could be that he was waiting for 
Frances . . . funny we never thought of 
that. 



INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS ELUH 



"You see, we have one person on the 
campus who keeps up with things" — thus 
spoke Professor Jarman of Brother Jack 
Martin when Jack very brightly answered 
a question on a dull Tuesday morning. We 
insist that Jack's keeping tab on every- 
thing that happens, and we do mean 



everything, is due to his being a member 
of this illustrious group — of which Johnny 
Hicks and Harry Wynne acted as presi- 
dents this year. Wonder if everyone gets 
as much out of being a member as Jack 
seems to have got. 



[22] 



FALL HAS FELL 



3, 



"all of the year '42-'43 — Remember — 
"Sure," you're saying for one reason or 
another, "How could I forget?" Who 
wants to forget it? The pledges to so- 
rorities and fraternities will long remember 
their experiences and the things through 
which they had to go to become members 
of one of the Greek letter organizations. 



The boys began mass signing up for E. R. 
C. — then lived in fear of a call, sugar ra- 
tioning cards had to be produced for Mrs. 
Charles, gas rationing came and with it, 
bicycles became very popular — and we 
were all sinqing such songs as "Praise the 
Lord and Pass the Ammunition" and "My 
Devotion." 




[23] 



^Afr 



"ny resemblance between persons 
pictured below and students of Atlantic 
Christian College during the fall of '42 is 
purely intentional and we might remind 
you that our photography department is 
not liable nor can it be sued. Well, maybe 
some of these snaps were turned in by' 
your best friends — So what — It's all in fun 





Who's the lucky dame? 

— Isn't it? This fall of '42 was a good 
one, even tho' we hated seeing our male 
cohorts leave for the armed services. 
But they all looked wonderful in their uni- 
forms when they returned for visits. 




[24] 




^jrallj l/Uinter, ^5prina — ^peeched! 

AMantlc Chelan College Library 

<±2056 wnson. n. c. 



7* 




Nothing but a gas ration ticket could stop 'em. 



2>. 



B ASKETBALL-1943 



o you remember back in '43 when 
along came the war and knocked the 
props right out from under intercollegiate 
sports? We were told no more basket- 
ball for the duration. And what we hated 
about it was that we really had a cracker- 
jack team. They won all but a couple of 
the games they did play. 

Looking on the brighter side — and does 
it shine — we got "Bo-hunkus" for the du- 
ration. E. C. T. C. couldn't touch us in 
basketball, and so the aforesaid trophy 
will reside at Atlantic Christian 'till sports 
of all kinds are resumed. 



So — what did we do? Well, we'll fresh- 
en up your memory for you. We had in- 
tramural sports that year. The sophomore 
boys were really hot — and remember 
those freshman girls? Yes sir, we ran class 
games and fully enjoyed them. We know 
lots of people who would call this a step 
forward, but we'll be glad when peace is 
declared, gas no longer rationed (don't 
forget tires), and intercollegiate sports are 
resumed. Then we'll show E. C. T. C. that 
we can keep "Bo-hunkus" without benefit 
of a war. 



[27] 




New member: 
"Pest." 



'A" CLUB AND CHEERLEADERS 



J, 



Lung power. 




"f you think there is any "messing" 
when it comes to swinging the paddles, 
ask Troy Godwin or Aaron Fussell to tell 
you about their experiences when being 
initiated into the "A" Club. They have 
only male members and all are "he-men" 
— could be their physical build-up in vari- 
ous athletics. Anyway they have plenty 
of muscles. 

And these same "he-men" elect the 
cheerleaders. They pick 'em cute, too. 
But why they ever got any competition 
for themselves and elected two boys this 
year is still not printed even in the best of 
books. But yells and not beauty could be 
the real reason. 



[28] 



WOMEN'S ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION 



J, 



"t wouldn't, be a Cabinet meeting if 
somebody weren't absent (cost 10c — 
payable to Maggie who kept the pot o' 
gold.) When this bunch got down to busi- 
ness, they really got things done. It's not 
just these Cabinet members that make 
up the W.A.A., it's all the girls with a yen 
for fun. Farmer presided in a dignified 
way when she had her notes collected and 
Kat scribbled so that posterity could 



know what went on. "Peanut" substituted 
when Farmer wasn't there (whom are we 
kidding?) Smalley, as advisor, kept them 
in the road while the class representatives 
saw to it that their cohorts got out to 
games. Every girl on the campus (includ- 
ing the Cabinet) prayed all year that the 
war with the gas and food rationing 
would not prevent the annual chicken sup- 
per spread. 



Half of a W.A.A.C. equals an A.C. 











[29] 




Horrosappyens. 



S D P H D M D R E CLASS OFFICERS 



Q 



h, la, la, and here we 
have the clever and wise 
Sophomores. They pondered 
and thought and finally de- 
cided to let Miriam Johnson 
(James), Lib White, Helen 
Renfrew and Willard Wood- 




years of hard work before 
them. A word of warn- 
ing to these wise ones: 
Don't let anything get you 
down. Push onward and up- 
ward — the junior year isn't 
so hard and then you will 



ard guide them through the year. In be dignified Seniors. You have a rough 

the fall of '41 they enlisted for two row to plow, but we're betting on you. 

years but now they have two more Don't let us down, class of '45. 



[30] 




SDPHDMORES-1943 



JOYCE BARNES 



First Row 
DORIS BAUMRIND LUCILLE BOYETTE ROBERT BROWN 



Second Row 
NIMROD CARROLL HOWARD CHAPIN ADA KATHERYN COOR RUBY DAVIS 

Third Row 
JUNIUS EVANS MILDRED EVERETTE JANET GRANTHAM LASTON GRANTHAM 



Fourth Row 
CHARLOTTE RUTH GRAY HORACE GRAY REGINALD GRAY 

L 31 1 



C. D. GURGANUS 



GRACE HILL 



First Row 
POLLY HINNANT DOROTHY JARVIS MARY JENNETTE 



MIRIAM JOHNSON 



Second Row 
THERON JONES IRENE KELLER KETHER KELLY 



CHARLES LATTA 



Third Row 
ADELE LEE MILTON LEWIS VERA BELLE LOFTIN 



MARY MASSEY 



Fourth Row 
MILTON MAY WILLIAM OSBORNE RELLA PACE 



THE 1943 




[32] 




SDPHDMDHES 



First Row 
BYRAN PARSONS MARY EMMA PERRY MAGDALENE PHILLIPS MIDE POWELL HELEN RENFROW 



Second Row 
ADA KATHRYNE RHODES MARJORIE SHEARIN ALICE SMITH 



LYLE REID STARLING ARNOLD TYNDALL 



Third Row 
JOAN UMSTEAD LOTTIE B. VANN EDWARD VAUSE 



JOHN WALKER HENRY WALTERS 



Fourth Row 
WILLIE CLYDE WEAVER LOIS WEBB ELIZABETH WHITE 



WILLARD WOODARD 



[33] 





Joy To The World. 



Y W C A AND 
Y M C A 



Pearls of great price. 



or once in the 
history of the Col- 
lege two organizations 
have successfully joined together and met 
without having someone get his feet 
stepped on. But maybe the Y. W. and 
the Y. M. felt that if they were to discuss 
topics concerning peace, certainly they 
could set the example — or did Mama 



Campus Religious Council serve as haven 
for all disagreements? 

Dr. Hartsock almost started a riot when 
she had her students put on a panel dis- 
cussion on the racial problem in Public 
Speaking and someone carried it over to 
the "Y" meeting. 

But as for the presidents, Ruby Jones 
and Charlie Harrison, they never said a 
word. 



[34] 




CAMPUS RELIGIOUS 
COUNCIL 



The Gold Mine. 



The "Y" Store idea was the brightest idea the Campus 

Religious Council ever had (the underlying purpose of the 

store is a Student Union Building.) Just what was needed 

to keep students broke. 




Cash Receipts Corporation. 



SJb 



his year's Council finally got Jarman 
out of Chairman's seat and put in Harri- 
son. Meeting progress slow — faculty 
council members argue. Wonder if Mr. 
Jarman plans his sentences here to run 
out exactly in the right length of time as 

[35] 



he does in class. Quote: "One minute 
forty seconds to go." 

Group takes care of religious life of 
students. That is, they do what they can 
for them. Example, Religious Emphasis 
Week. 




All eyes on Lyman. 



JUNIOR- CLASS OFFICERS 



*I/h 



hese quiz - kid Juniors 
have been at it for three 
years, so they knew enough to 
elect Avis Keene, Lib John- 
son, Lyman Gray, and Ava 
Gray Barnes to lead them. 
Ask 'em anything — they al- 




trail upward and will be Top- 
Sergeants. I must warn them, 
too — don't be too cocky — 
the Senior year is no joy-ride. 
You'll find it tough but if you 
are as good as your predeces- 
sors, you'll make the grade. 



ways know the answer. Their term of en- Some of you won't come back, but for 

listment is almost over. One year from those of you who do — your day will come 

today they will have finished the long and you will be Seniors — the class of '44. 



[36] 




BILLIE ADAMS 



First Row 
VIRGINIA DARE ADKINS 



PHILIP BANKS 



AVA GREY BARNES 



GABRILLA BARWICK 



Second Row 
RUTH BLIZZARD 



REBECCA COCKRELL 



ETHEL CLAYTON DAVIS 



ERNESTINE DOUB 



Third Row 
GEORGE FARMER 



RUTH FERGUSON 



AARON FUSSELL 



J U IV I R S - 1 3 4 3 



[37] 



J U IV I R S - 1 9 4 3 



LYMAN GRAY 



DOROTHY HELSABECK 



BEULAH HORNE 



JACK JENNETTE 



ELIZABETH JOHNSON 



AVIS KEENE 



DORIS LASSITER 



KATHERINE LEWIS 



CLAUDIA LUCAS 



SALLY LUCAS 



JULIA GRAY MINCHEW 



DONNELL NARRON 



HUME PASCHALL 



BILLY PATE 



RACHEL PETERSON 




[38] 




UNA PHELPS ISLA PHIPPS 



First Row 
MARY LOUISE ROSE DIXIE SMITH 



EDWARD SMITH 



Second Row 
ETHEL STANCIL ALVIN SUGG CHARLOTTE THOMAS SUSIE TOMLINSON DEWEY TYSON 

Third Row 
JOHN TYSON MELVILLE WARREN EARLE WILLIAMS VICTORIA WILLIAMSON GEORGE YIONOULIS 



J U IV I D R S - 1 9 4 3 



[39] 




Chirp, chirp, and 
cheep. 



ENSEMBLE 



Full speed ahead — but only for a 
semester. This group of girls was singing 
their way right along when — bam — Mr. 
Grove left and took their voices with him. 



Surely the loss of one single man has 
caused no other group of girls such a case 
of hush-mouth. 



EOIVEERT EDMMITTEE 



They hire 'em — we hear "em. 




J, 



"n close harmony with the Ensemble is the 
Concert Committee, for this same aforemen- 
tioned man left a vacant spot here too. But Mr. 
Fontaine and "Gita" were reported as "getting 
along fine" over matters of who was to play for 
us and when. If a contract couldn't be signed, 
Mr. Fontaine just played himself (after telling 
charming little stories about his pieces — remem- 
ber the one about the tear drops.) But everyone 
feared for the mind-reader to come as he was 
supposed to be pretty good. Out, evil thoughts! 



[40] 




The Swing and Bray Club. 



GLEE ELUfl 



V_^ > V 



'veryone watch me" is a phrase all 
the Glee Club members will readily recog- 
nize. Mr. Fontaine raises his hands, and 
as the voices begin blending, everyone 
listens for the last song. This year, be- 
cause of the gas and tire shortage, the 
club had to keep their talent on the cam- 
pus, and those were mighty good meals 
the churches had. Maybe next year the 
College will own a couple of horses and 
wagons. Anyway they did a fine job this 
year, and deserve much credit. 



"Busted-up" and started all over again 
by organizing at second semester. (Must 
be getting to be a habit with the Glee 
Club and the Education Club.) Jessie 
Stephenson won honors as president. 
Jessie Turner practiced every night in 
hopes, of taking over top spot . . . promo- 
tion from this year as vice-president. 
Now they even have a constitution and 
charge fees for cuts. Fontaine reported 
pleased! 



[41] 



EDUCATION CLUB 



^-/h. 



hey say when the Education Club 
reorganized and became not just the Edu- 
cation Club but the Calvin Wiley Educa- 
tion Club, if you please, that it took Mr. 
Grim and Mr. Jarman three meetings to 
get the constitution worded to cover 
every little detail — also to see that no 
one could cut a meeting. So in order to 
get everyone included, they are now the 
Future Teachers of America Club. Then 



when a special representative of the 
F. T. A. came down to speak, Mr. Jarman 
told all his classes (in his round about 
way) that it would be to their "benefit" 
to be on hand. Scared everyone to death 
as it was the night before third quarter 
exams on History of Education. Then, 
too, all English majors were afraid not to 
go when Dr. Hartsock was scheduled to 
speak. What a system! 



Grim's grimlings. 




-AS 



ft 

Ai JmAaaA 




[42] 



» 



WINTER HAS CUM 

ust when fall stopped and winter be- around here somewhere. And if you were 



gan was hard to determine exactly this around robed, or practically disrobed, you 

year. These snaps are meant to depict were the next victim for a film. No sub- 

for you scenes and people in winter. So jects available during long Christmas va- 

when you glance over the page and say, cation. Wouldn't it have been nice to see 

"Hey, look, that's me" — grammatically Mr. Case strolling over to the office (tak- 

you'll be wrong — pictorially you'll quite ing his time as usual) in that big snow? 

probably be right for you probably are Guess he ran! 




[43] 



w> 



inter came and with it went some 
of our inmates. First mid-term gradu- 
ation in history of the institution was when 
I I of our number received their sheep- 
skins (for proof see picture in upper right 
corner) amidst tears and congratulations. 
Depart — Edith, "Magqie," "Patty" and 
Polly to "Billygoat," Virginia — (where they 
will be joined by their sisters, come 
spring). Howard and Thornton to the 
Navy — and so it goes. The Christmas 




Half-baked. 



No pictures . . . but we picked cotton, too. 





Cabaret (and later the 
Stunt Night Cabaret) you 
will remember, the parties, 
and the all-too-few basket- 
ball games we enjoyed. 

Rides in cars were saved 
for bare necessities. Songs 
carried patriotic themes al- 
though we all liked "There 
Are Such Things," "White 
Christmas" and "Dearly 
Beloved." 




[44] 




d5read 7 d5eun5 and J^olaloed 




Pedaling out! 



SENIOR CLASS OFFICERS 



.A 



salute to the Seniors. 
Captains Earl Hardison and 
Bruce Davis and their able 
lieutenants, Frances Sermons, 
Celia Crawley, and Ruby 
Jones, have led you through 
a turbulent year to victory. 
You have reached the top of 




now you are on a furlough — 
free to go where you will and 
do what you want to do. You 
have struggled through prac- 
tice teaching, education, and 
rules and regulations. You 
have your sheepskin — your 
college days are over. Now, 



the ladder, the peak of college perfec- voyager, go forth into life and give it all 

tion — rise and shine. You have thrown you've got. You'll come out triumphant, 

your tassel, served your four years, and Cheers and congratulations, class of '43. 

[ 47] 



SENIOR CLASS 
1943 



• RUSSELL ARNOLD . . . original . . . Washington 
County ... a flair for writing ... at ease at the easel. 

• CAROLYN BAGGETTE . . . "lovely to look at, delight- 
ful to know" . . . easy to get along with. 

• HOWARD BLAKE . . . that clean cut look . . . genu- 
ine . . . thinks thrice before he speaks . . . one-girl-man. 

• ELEANOR BLOW . . tidy . . . trim ... no vacan- 
cies in the date book . . . missed roommate after mid- 
term. 



• ELIZABETH BROWNING . 
. . . mistress of any situation . 
named "Todos". 



. second woman prexy 
. cute smile . . . nick- 



• HAZEL BRUTON . . . soft spoken . . .haunts bowling 
alley ... a Mrs. now. 



• RAY CARRAWAY . . . ambitious . 
steady . . . deep . . . self-assured. 



. slight and 



• OTIS CARTER ... a true species of the masculine 
gender . . . petticoat fever . . . (line). 




[ 48] 




• EDITH CARTWRIGHT ... a drawling talker . . . 
governmental gal . . . Boss in the dorm. 



• CASSIE MAY COWELL . . . speed-demon on 
basketball court . . . geography learned by letters 
from army. 



• CELIA CRAWLEY . . . you can count on her . . 
enjoys close harmony both in music and in life . . 
May Day Boss. 



• BRUCE DAVIS ... A. C.'s Beau Brummel ... in- 
fectious smile . . . smooth dancer . . . intense eyes. 



• L. C. DAVIS, JR. . . . quiet and unassuming in 
manner . . . historically informed. 



• KATHERINE DEANS . . . better late than never 
. . . good-natured ... a firm believer in day 
dreaming. 



• MARGARET FARMER . . . master of math . . . 
knows her mind and speaks it . . . broke practice 
teaching record. 



# THERESA FISHER . . . quaint and winsome man- 
ner . . . hard worker . . . first name — Betty. 



± 



jA± 



j 






SENIOR CLASS 
1943 



[49] 



SENIOR CLASS 
1943 




• ALBERT GAINEY . . . "All that we save in noise we 
gain in power" . . . serious minded . . . welcome re- 
freshment for exhausted teachers. 

• MARGARET GARRISS . . . "Buie" . . . laughing, 
loyal . . . rats in the night scare her . . . travel rationed. 

• MARGARET GLOVER . . . majors in friends, minors 
in activities . . . statuesque blonde . . . another Senior 
using her ring finger for its purpose. 

• MADALINE GODWIN . . . conscientiousness personi- 
fied . . . sweet, studious and striking . . . House Presi- 
dent. 



• SARA MAE GREENE . . . "Johnny" ... my pal and 
yours . . . rare sense of humor . . . seldom serious . . . 
candid camera enthusiast. 

• EARL HARDISON . . . gift of gab . . . sociable . . . 
always teasing . . . Hollywood smile. 

• CHARLES HARRISON . . . pensive . . . future preacher 
. . . laughs at anybody's jokes ... try him! 

• FRANCES HEMBY . . . petite . . . flirtatious . . . 
gigglesome . . . council mama. 




[50] 




• JOHN HICKS, JR. . . . Maggie's Jiggs . . . bas- 

keteer . . . masculinity fused with gentlemanliness. 



• HAZEL JOHNSON . . . swing addict . . . blonde 
. . . frisky . . . alive . . . cute . . . carefree and 
clever. 



• RUBY JONES . . . calmly enjoys living ... re- 
served, reasonable, responsible . . . words are few 
but thoughts are many. 



• LILLIAN LAMM . . . independent . , . loves bi- 
cycle trips in the country and arguments. 



• VIRGINIA LANCASTER . . . temperamental . . . 
always on the go . . . broody . . . seems busier than is. 



• MARGARET LASSITER . . . patient . . . a good 
word for all . . . as constant as the Northern Star. 



• AMBROSE MANNING . . . fleet of foot when 
a cow is behind . . . every man is a volume if you 
know him. 



• JACK MARTIN ... one of Wrigley's best cus- 
tomers . . . has nose for news . . . nabbed by Fresh- 
men maidens. 



Mm 



SENIOR CLASS 
1943 



[51] 



SENIOR CLASS 
1943 



• RUTH MATTHEWS . . . accommodating 
outskirts of town . . . quiet. 




on the G BETTY MILLER . . . vivaciously vivid . . see her about 

anything in this book . . . address (she ain't here). . . . 



• CARRIE DAVIS MAY . . . tall, refreshingly unsophis- 
ticated . . . crimson top hence "Red" . . . flair for 
knitting. 

• ELSIE MAY . . . jolly . . . jabbers . . . "How in the 
world are you?" . . . postoffice mom. 



• NAOMI MORRIS . . . ability, intelligence, person- 
ality ... all in one nut shell. 



• LESSIE MURRAY . . . linguistic aptitude, parle fran- 
cais and habla espanol . . . made it to Senior Class fast. 



• MYRTLE MAY . . . perpetual giggle . . . jolly dis- 
position . . . main occupation: chattering over 'phone. 



• PLUMA NARRON . . . never know she's the 
small package . . . good natured. 




[52] 




• SAPIRO O'NEAL . . . well-equipped on the upper 
lip . . . another from the O'Neal clan to graduate. 



FLORENCE PACE . . . libs life plain and simple 
. . bashful . . . little sister following in footsteps. 



• CAROLYN PARRISH . . . "Ceepy" ... are you 
kidding . . , knows her sports . . . wacky . . . noisy . . . 
lots to say . . . always gay. 



G EMMA PRICE . . . not what she says — the way she 
says it . . . always in a holiday mood . . . charmingly 
undignified. 



• DAISY RENFROW . . . prospective mist.-ess of a 
school room . . . dependable as April showers. 



• HULDOH ROWE ... a quietness and reserve that 
makes for a quaint charm ... A. C.'s Veronica Lake. 



• EVELYN RUSSELL . . . calm, cool, and collected 
. . . "A Little Bit South of North Carolina" . . . he's 
her "guy". 



• FRANCES SERMONS ... A. C.'s Oueenie . . . 
loves pickles . . . well wrought . . . cute clothes . . . 
"Sister." 




4§A 



3 






SENIOR CLASS 
1943 



SENIOR CLASS 
1943 







9 GUY SMITH . . . immaculate in dress - , . simonized 
with Vitalis . . . Ford's his fad . . . Hodges' stand-in. 

• NANNIE BLANCHE STOKES . . . Major domo of 
the dining hall . . . partial to Phi Delta Gamma. 

• DORA LANE STRICKLAND ... as dependable as 
7:59 . . . scholastically earnest . . . aims to please . . . 
and does. 

• POLLY SWINDELL . . . fragile . . . dainty and demure 
. . . trips a light fantastic . . . cute (but definitely). 

• ROBERT THORNTON . . . tall, easy going, friendly 
. . . lots of leisure time . . . lopes lazily from class to 
class . . . navy man. 



• EUGENIA TOMLINSON . . . "Gene" . . . tall and 
willowy . . . believes in getting things done on time 

. . . teaching's old stuff now. 

• ANN WAINWRIGHT . . . spontaneous giggle . . . 
witty, sarcastic, cute . . . fad got her hair. 

• CLELL WHITE . . . knows more than she ever tells . . . 
'nuff said. 

• DORIS WHITE . . When "Dolly" says it . . . 'tis 
said . . . another third floor cutter-upper . . . definitely 
not to be lead around. 




[54] 



GOLDEN KNOT HONOR SOCIETY 



u 



' 

)r$ a light tap on the head ever felt like 
a swift kick, it's the touch of the golden knot 
when you've just been tapped," quotes any 
member of the Golden Knot Honor Society. 

When you need agents to raise a little 
clash for you, see above-mentioned group. 
After a long-winded but unexpected talk 
(due to transportation difficulties of speaker) 
by President Morris and two short pep talks 
by members Blake and Lewis, the Interna- 
tional Students' Fund netted almost $60.00 
to help a worthy cause. The goal was set 
and immediately, not the bottom, but the 
top came out. 



No buttons, please. 




All is not gold that glitters. 




[55] 



^ 



SPRING HAS SPRANG 



s it inevitably does, spring has friends must part. This is spring. By this 

arrived and the balm in the air gives us time we hardly ever see a car. We pre- 



all an excuse for seeming a bit "balmy". 
Look through these snaps and see you and 
your pals lazing through the spring daze 
— forgetting the coming exams to play 
tennis or to lie around on the campus. 
The time comes when even the best of 



diet our children will have to be told 
about them along with the "good old 
days". By now A. C. C. has sent so many 
boys to the armed forces. We've played 
baseball, tennis, Softball, etc., to keep 
ourselves physically fit. 




[56] 




JI& ^prina — ^rhj oLot/el 



INTRODUCING THE GREEKS 



S, 



igma Alpha Kappa, Delta Sigma 
Gamma, Phi Alpha and numerous other 
combinations, are what Phi Kappa Alpha, 
Sigma Tau Chi, Phi Delta Gamma, Sigma 
Alpha, and Phi Sigma Tau become when 
a new crop of Freshmen arrive. Of all the 
things to learn, the names of the Greek 
organizations seem hardest for them. 

But come Moving Up Day everyone 
soon learns that Phi Delta Gamma is the 



frat whose house is at the back gate and 
who is brother to Delta Sigma Sorority; 
Sigma Alpha is the frat whose back steps 
connect with the dining hall, and whose 
sisters are Phi Sigma Tau; Phi Kappa 
Alpha is the frat with the blinking Greek 
letters (how would the girls know that — 
lights don't burn in the daytime) and are 
teamed with Sigma Tau Chi. 

So be on the lookout, Freshmen. 




[59] 



s 



PHI KAPPA ALPHA 

till content to live in the house with counterfeiting machine. Manning is secretary 



steps — Big Dawg is Blake — Earl Hadison just and Narron acts as Sergeant. This house, too, 

barks. Philip, honest in the people's choice owns quite a few Romeos with the President 

for master of the treasury and the chapter courting our Maryland gal and Howard Chap- 



in keeping a watchful eye over Frances. Meet- 



ings are held by the music of their vic-combi- 



nation purchase of last year. All lurk in rear 



of house Thursday P. M. and turn house over 



to sisters for their weekly fights. 



Naval Reserve. 





[60] 



SIGMA TAU CHI 



*^>Ar i 



olds weekly fights in Phi Kappa Alpha 
chapter room. While Carrie Davis knits, mem- 
bers argue over which boogie-woogie record to 
play. Earle calls the sessions — Dolly understudies 
— Emma takes down sisters' saying colloquially 
. . . "Gita" collects dues and pays damages. 
Sisters very reserved and dignified when co- 



mamas Whitley and Hodges present, except 
Johnny, who sprawls on floor. Sisters Betty, 
Frances, and Earle always remain in hall talking 
to boy friend brothers. Had feed at Weed for 
departing brothers. Tested dramatic ability by 
sponsoring "Y" Christmas play. Haven't tried 
anything since. 



Sigma Tau Cow ... a la Hilley. 



■ : i 




Angels on the rim 





[61] 



-A 



SIGMA ALPHA 

s close as possible to the Dining is the only one with legible hand-writing so he 



Hall. Except for girls calling their boy friends, 



the meetings are fairly calm. Johnny Hicks 



starts the show with Jones as sub — Martin 




is secretary and also money-changer. There's 



the phone again. Oh, these handsome Rom- 



eos! Other officers include Davis as Sergeant 



at Arms and Fussel as chaplain. With the ser- 



ice taking so many boys, the frat managed 



to throw several parties to keep up thei 



morale. Brethren take in roomers. Please cal 



at back door, since front door is rarely used. 



Army Reserve. 




[62] 



PHI SIGMA TAU 

•^S hursday brings the weekly parade of mem- 
bers to ye old meeting room. The radio plays 
at full blast as Browning removes her shoes and 
begs for attention . . . Cowell waits for her day 
as next in line. The pen and ink belong to Rus- 
sell and the bank account to Blizzard. The spon- 



sors come pedaling up just in time to hit the 
refreshment line. Ho hum . . . another student re- 
cital so there go White and Crawley. Annual 
party given for the Bulldogs and all their owners. 
Pride in keeping good scholastic average. 



We don't live here anymore. 




Bottled but harmless! 







ik 






[63] 



PHI DELTA GAMMA 



O 



n deck in the middle of the block on 



scribbles for the chapter, while Carraway 



the right side of the college. Gray is big 
chief — Woodard is merely chief. This fra- 
ternity seems to have two secretaries — Adams 



m-i. 




keeps the correspondence alive. Thornton 



tries to keep up with the filthy lucre and at 



the same time keep his waist line down. 



What? Two more officers? Yep, there are 



Davis as Chaplain and Evans as Sergeant-at- 



Arms. Put the feed bag on last month and 



everybody got nice and greasy from chicken 



and barbecue. 



Air Corps Reserve. 




[64] 



DELTA SIGMA 



I /I oung chicks in a bunch — Farmer insists 
«_>/ meetings begin with a prayer, so she takes 
care of the religious end — Morris acts as com- 
mander with Glover taking over when com- 
mander is away on official or otherwise business. 
Swindell sits on her knees and takes dictation as 
she is secretary — Parrish keeps close tab on the 



money bag she knitted. That's quite a joke to 
be told when Farmer just finished her prayer — 
Oh, Farmer told the joke, that's different. Cart- 
wright, Swindell and Glover are expecting every- 
one up to their penthouse in Billygoat, Virginia — 
Don't diappoint them!!! 



Please note swanky surroundings. 




When you and 1 were young, Maggie. 





[65] 




Not to be held responsible. 



PINE KIVDT-1343 



»^_jr$ you think this annual is a mess, just take 
a look at the staff. Editor Betty Miller left mid- 
term for parts unknown and cohort Kat Lewis 
took over with her eyes closed. While snappy 




Mmmmmm:m mwmtm 



Johnny Greene snapped snaps, Lib Browning 
got the dope on the Greeks. Red-pencil-pusher 
Peanut Morris corrected commas and misplaced 
modifiers and Margie Shearin acted as general 
office boy — she could do 
anything. 

Dr. Hartsock was chief- 
checker-upper in the form of 
advisor and she was also kind 
enough to lend us her Muse 
on special write-ups. 

While editors put us in 
the black and white, Mar- 
garet Farmer kept us out of 
the red. Misery loves com- 
pany, so Margaret appoint- 
ed Emma Price as assistant in 
the torturesome job of "ad- 
getting." 

But to us, the editors and 
business managers, the job of 
putting out this book has 
been fun and may everyone 
of you have the same pleas- 
ure of putting out an annual 
sometimes. (Pardon us if we 
wish hard luck off on you.) 



[66] 



THE CDLLEGI ATE 



We crept into the room at night — 
The staff-room we do mean; 
And surely was such gloomy sight 
By eye of man ne'er seen. 

The air was thick, the voices loud 
And bottles I . strewed the floor 
For, near the deadline date, this crowd 
Its locks collective tore. 




mnraHi 
Nackos checks Rose; May works Starling. 



Mary Louise is getting them told. 
Bill, Ed, and Dot are doing their col-yums, 
While Carrie affirms that all ads are sold, 
And Nackos's eyes are flashing volumes. 



So — here's to our Staff — 
And so long may it slave 
As people can read 
And editors rave. 



I. Coke bottles, of course. 




Sell 'em to the fish market. Prices high! 

[67] 




IN SPITE DF 
IT ALL 



*^rr , 



ere we have Queenie of 
the Burlesque Show and Ole King 
Cole — alias Frances Sermons and 
Johnny Hicks, King and Queen of 
May. Below is the beautiful siren, 
"Bill," as Maid of Honor, who is 
reportedly expecting Sis's crown in 
a few years. Those attendants 
aren't really that scared, they just 
don't take a good picture. Didn't 
know until the last minute if there 
would be any boys at all in the 
court. 

Next???? 




[68] 



/?. 



• emember? A handsome pair were "Libby 
Anne" and Joe Frank, weren't they? And Mar- 
garet Ange, "Pro" Lassiter, Marjorie Barnes, 
Joe Holliday and Katherine Wainwright all were 
good looking enough to make your eyeballs stand 
at attention. May Day was one of the finest 
ever last year, and everybody performed beau- 
tifully. Remember how "Madie" Denning ran 
around like the proverbial chicken with its head 
cut off? We recall that she was almost ready 
for a padded call by the time she finished direct- 



ing the event. But she did herself proud and 
everyone was proud of her. Miss Smalley labored 
too, teaching unwilling students folk dances which 
they didn't want to do. And costumes — remem- 
ber how everyone was rushing around at the last 
minute trying to get things put together. It's at 
times like these that one realizes the value of 
safety pins. But we all got through it, which 
proves the validity of the "survival of the fittest" 
theory. 



. . 




This was last year. Wonder 
if they'll show US off next 
year? 



[69] 



CASH AND CARRY 

FIDELITY CLEANERS 



Wilson, N. C. 



Dial 231 I 



SELL YOUR TOBACCO AT 

THE FARMERS WAREHOUSE 

Wilson, North Carolina 



HOSPITALIZATION, ACCIDENT, AUTO 
AND FIRE INSURANCE 

Buy Mutual Insurance 
and Save the Difference 

R. A. PERRY 

Mutual Insurance Agency 



&etctkmt^avu££. 



ICE CKEAU 



Telephone 2134 Wilson, N. C. 



L'lL TOM'S 




RAINBOW 


GRILL 


"Where Collegians Meet 


and Eat" 


* 




132 NORTH GOLDSBORO STREET 


24 HOUR SERVICE 



EASTERN AUTO SUPPLY COMPANY 

Bicycle Parts and Repairs — Auto Parts and Accessories 

Dial 3083 123 S. Tarboro St. Wilson, N. C. 



COMPLIMENTS OF 


LONDON 


SHOP 


Ladies' Ready- 


to-Wear 



BEST WISHES AND CONTINUED SUCCESS 
THROUGHOUT LIFE 

WILSON CHAMBER OF COMMERCE 



ANDERSON, DEANS, AND WOODARD, INC. 



General Insurance and Loans 



Phone 3091 



Fidelity Building 



COMPLIMENTS 



OF 



WILSON HARDWARE 
COMPANY 

"Court House in Front of Us" 



SPORTING GOODS 



Wilson, North Carolina 



SHOP WITH CONFIDENCE 

AND 

WEAR WITH PRIDE 

LEDER BROTHERS 
DEPARTMENT STORES 

WILSON, NORTH CAROLINA 



THEATRE SODA SHOP 

SCHRAFFT'S CANDIES 

The Handy Place for Magazines, Drinks, Candies 
Sandwiches and Tobaccos 

WILSON, NORTH CAROLINA 




THESE GIRLS 



AT 



JO ANN SHOPPE 



ARE 



Hi 3 m STRICTLY ON THE BEAM 



DAVIS 
AUTO COMPANY 

GENERAL AUTO 
REPAIRING 

Acetylene and Electric 
Welding 



COMPLIMENTS 



OF 



COLLEGE GROCERY 



GILL'S RADIO SERVICE 



Dial 331 



1 3 I S. Douglas Street 



Wilson, North Carolina 



SELL YOUR TOBACCO 
AT 

CENTRE BRICK WAREHOUSE 

COZART-EAGLES AND COMPANY 



"WE LEAD WILSON— WILSON LEADS THE WORLD" 





BROWN OIL COMPANY 








Distributors 








PURE OIL PRODUCTS 






Motor Oils 


Nos. 

"You Can be Sure With Pure" 


1 and 2 Fu< 


5 | Oils 


We Meter 


Your Fuel Oil Direct to Your Tank, Thereby Saving 


Shrubbery 





LUCIELLE'S DRESS SHOP 

"Known for Beauty, Quality, Styles and Values" 
219 E.Nash St. Wilson, N. C. 



Dial 3401 



NEW YORK CAFE 

Good Food — Plenty of Sugar for Your Coffee 



See JOHN or CHRIS 




Wilson, North Carolina 
"Quality Food at Money-Saving Prices" 



DANIEL 
ROOFING SUPPLIES 

J. A. DANIEL 

Proprietor 

121 South Douglas St. 
Wilson, N. C. Dial 2346 



COMPLIMENTS 



OF 



BARDIN 

COAL 

COMPANY 





COMPLIMENTS OF 






HEILIG AND MEYERS 




Wilson, N. C. 




Dial 3060 



COMPLIMENTS 

OF 

PROGRESSIVE STORES 

Incorporated 





SELL TOBACCO 




AT THE 




BANNER WAREHOUSE 




WITH 


A. 


W.FLEMING CHAS. M. FLEMING 











M. 


D. 


ETHERIDGE 












Plumbing 


an 


d Heating Contractor 




Wi 


son, 


N. 


C. 








Dial 3269 



LIKE MANY OTHER AMERICAN MANUFACTURERS 

Our Entire Production Is Now on Equipment for 
Winning the War 

Bear With Us Until the War Is Over 

THEN 

Let Us Supply the BUSES You Will Need for Your NEW FLEET 

In the Meantime 
BUY WAR BONDS AND STAMPS 

HACKNEY BROS. BODY COMPANY 

WILSON, NORTH CAROLINA 



The College Girl's Shop 

STADIEM'S LADIES' SHOP 

"Apparel That Appeals" 

WILSON, NORTH CAROLINA 



IT'S THE VOGUE 

TO VISIT 

VOGUE BEAUTY 
SHOP 



National Bank Building 



Dial 2331 



Compliments of 

HUNT FUNERAL HOME 



Wilson, N. C. 



Dial 3149 





Compliments of 






TERMINAL DRUG STORE 




Wilson, N. C. 




Dial 2791 or 3469 



R. E. DEANS 

Plumbing and Heating 
Contractor 



107 N. Douglas St. 



Wilson, N. C. 



EAT AT 

MURPHY'S 

DELICIOUS SANDWICHES AND 
COLD DRINKS 

Uptown and Herring Ave. 



Visit Our Model Six Room House 

THIRD FLOOR 

GOOD LUCK GRADUATES 

FROM 

R. E. QUINN & CO. 

"Carolina's Finest" 

FURNITURE 
DRAPERIES— CARPETS 

For Sifts That Delight 

Visit 

QUINN'S GIFT SHOP 

First Floor 
137 S. Goldsboro St. Dial 318 



THOMAS-YELVERTON COMPANY 



Funeral Directors 

Wilson, N. C. 



Better Furniture 



Ambulance Service 

Dial 3121 



R. E. TOWNSEND & COMPANY 




Real Estate — Insurance 


- 


121 S Goldsboro St. 


Wilson, N. C. 



CONGRATULATIONS 
CLASS OF '43 

BELK TYLER 
COMPANY 

WILSON'S SHOPPING CENTER 



GOLDEN 
WEED GRILL 



"Where Good Food and Good Service 
Go Hand in Hand" 



WILSON MARKET CO. 

NATIVE AND WESTERN MEATS 
POULTRY, ETC. 

FISH AND OYSTERS IN SEASON 

Phone 2117 



R. T. SMITH 



COMPLIMENTS 
OF 

NEW PLANTERS WAREHOUSE 

No. I and No. 2 

WILSON, NORTH CAROLINA 

"Service You Can Depend On" 

Proprietors 
W. G. CARR, JR. 



B. W. CARR 



COMPLIMENTS 



OF 



THE NATIONAL 



BANK 



WILSON, N. C. 



W. L WALSTON 

PLUMBING AND 
HEATING 



Dial 2495 



Wilson, N. C. 



BISSETTE'S DRUG STORES 


Wilson 


— Greenville, N. C. 




• 


Serving 


Eastern Carolina at a 




Saving 



VEGETABLES 
MEATS 



I HOUSE GROCERY 



DIAL 113b 



HOUSE GROCERY/ 

FromHGUSE-to-house 4 

~ ^ - 418 S.GOLDSBORO ST. 



CHICKENS 
EGGS 



EFIRD'S DEPARTMENT STORE 



WILSON'S LARGEST 
Quality Merchandise for the Entire Family at Lowest Prices 

229-231 E. Nash St. Opposite Post Office 



Wilson, N. C. 



SELL YOUR TOBACCO 

AT THE 

BIG STAR WAREHOUSE 

WILSON, NORTH CAROLINA 
GIBBONS, WAINWRIGHT & WALLACE 



Owners and Proprietors 



Compliments of 

BRANCH BANKING & TRUST COMPANY 



Wilson 
Elm City 
Warsaw 



"The 


Safe Executor" 


Wallace 


Faison 


Goldsboro 


Kinston 


S f ;lma 


Trenton 


Fayettevill 


j Fremont 



Plymouth 
New Bern 

Willlarnston 



(Sound Banking and Trust Service for Eastern Carolina) 

Member of Federal Deposit Corporation 



Wilson, N. C. 



HOWARD ADKINS, INC. 

Exclusive Furnishings for Men 



Dial 2435 



G. S. TUCKER & CO., INC. 

"Wilson's Oldest Furniture Store" 

122 S. Goldsboro St. Complete Home Furnishings 



Wilson, N. C. 



FARMERS 

QJJRLITY -F-eftTILIZ-e-RS 

"Best by Actual Test" 

FOR ALL CROPS 

Farmers Fertilizers Represent the Best That 
Science Can Offer in Making 

QUALITY FERTILIZERS 

FARMERS COTTON 
OIL CO. 

Norfolk, Va. Lillington, N. C. Wilson, N. C. 



COMPLIMENTS 
OF 

OASIS AND DRAKE 
THEATRES 

WILSON, N. C. 



MOSS & COMPANY 

"Treat People Right" 

ON 

DRY GOODS • CLOTHING 
SHOES 

I 32- 1 34- 1 36 Tarboro St. Wilson, N. C. 



ELLIOTT BEAUTY SUPPLY COMPANY 

Beauty Parlor Equipment and Supplies 

Hunter Elliott Phone 2881 



215 E. Barnes Street 



Wilson, N. C. 



COMPLIMENTS 
OF 

BRUCE LAMM 

"Styled Men's Wear" 

WILSON, NORTH CAROLINA 



FAIRFIELD 
DAIRY PRODUCTS 

Incorporated 

"Perfectly Pasteurized Milk" 

Dairy Products 
Pine State Ice Cream 



Dial 3232 



Wilson, N. C. 



A 


L 


W 


A 


Y 


S 
In 


A GOOD 

WGTM 

Service of Home and Nation 

Affiliated 


S 


H 


O 


W 


MUTUAL 


BROADCASTING 


SYSTEM TOBACCO 


NETWORK 


(key 


stat 


on) 



In preparing to go to the "Spring Hop" 

Patronize MULLENS BARBER SHOP 

WILSON, NORTH CAROLINA 



WIMPY'S 
POCKET BILLIARD PARLOR 

SOFT DRINKS 

Best Spot in Town for Clean Recreation 



Come in and see our new college 
styles. They're swell! 




Dial 2124 



WILSQN,N,< 

Wilson, N. C. 



COMPLIMENTS 

OF 

KINSTON DAILY 
FREE PRESS 

"America's Premier Small City Daily" 

Trademark Registered 



A True and Tried Friend of Education 



DR. C. L. BLACKBURN 

WILSON'S 
CHIROPRACTOR 

National Bank Building 



P. L WOODARD & CO. 

GENERAL MERCHANDISE 
COTTON and FERTILIZERS 

WILSON, N. C. 



DR. L J. HERRING IMPLEMENT CO. 

Dealers in 
INTERNATIONAL HARVESTER COMPANY FARM IMPLEMENTS 

Residence 2482 PHONES 



Office 2469 







Compliments of 












BARNES MOTOR & 


PARTS COMPANY 








Complete 


Automotive Service 




Wilson 


N. 


C. 



BE PENNEY WISE 

Reliable Merchandise at Lowest Possible 
Prices 

"PENNEY'S" 

J. C. PENNEY COMPANY 



WILSON DRUG COMPANY 

Incorporated 
I 14 South Tarboro Street 

SHEAFFER PEN and PENCILS 
NUNNALLY'S CANDY 

A Prescription Drug Store 



CAROLINA OFFICE EQUIPMENT COMPANY 

Printers — Stationers — Office Outfitters 



Wilson, N. C. 



Dial 2337 



COMPLIMENTS 

OF 

STEPHENSON LUMBER 
COMPANY 

WILSON, NORTH CAROLINA 



COMPLIMENTS 

OF 

PEACOCK GROCERY 
COMPANY 

Wayne Animal and Poultry Feeds 
Hay, Corn, Oats and Provisions 

Tel. 2805 Wilson, N. C. 





FIRESTONE STORES 






Supplies for the Home and the Car 




202 E. Nash St. 


Dial 4183 


Wilson, N. C. 



THE WOMAN'S SHOP 

Ready-to-Wear, American Golfer and 
Nelly Don Dresses 

Carroll Building — Second Floor 

305 1-2 East Nash Street 
Phone 2783 Wilson, N. C. 



HEMBY'S 



216 E. Nash St. 



Dial 2083 



COMPLIMENTS 

OF 

CAROLINA LAUNDRY 

Laundries and Dry 
Cleaners 

Dial 2164 
WILSON, NORTH CAROLINA 



COMPLIMENTS 

OF 

DILDY HARDWARE 
COMPANY 

WILSON, N. C. 



AN INVITATION 

Atlantic Christian College invites the young people of Eastern North Carolina 
to consider the advantages it offers to students in this area in the faith that they 
will find here a genuine value and that they will profit by the work and life of the 
institution. 

It invites a visit from students who may be interested in pursuing their education. 

It invites correspondence about the problems of young people. 



AN OFFER 

It Offers to Send a Catalogue and Full Information on Request 

ATLANTIC CHRISTIAN COLLEGE 

WILSON, NORTH CAROLINA 




These Girls are Setting a 
Style That Won't be Hard 
to Follow by Shopping at 



THE 



MOTHER and DAU6HTER 
STORE 



IN 



WILSON 



Help Build a Student Union Building 
Patronize the College 

"Y" STORE 



WILLIAMS LUMBER COMPANY 

Lumber and Building Material 

"We Sell Everything to Build Anything" 



THE 
WILSON BAKERY 



Makers of 



"DIXIE BREAD" 



"We Supply This Institution" 



Phc ne 2769 



Wilson, N. C. 



Drink 




in Bottles 




^^florisT- 1 



Wilson, N. C. 



Dial 2022 



WILSON DYE WORKS 

Expert Cleaners and Dyers 



Wilson, N. C. 



Dial 3420 



Congratulations to 


the 


Publications Staff of the "Pine Knot." Few Realiie the Work an 


Annual 








Represents. 






P. 


D. 


GOLD PUBLISHING COMPANY 






Publishers of the Wilson Daily Times, the Wilson Times, and the Collegiate 

















W. R. MILLER 

Fruits, Vegetables, Eggs, and Chickens 

We Carry a Large Stock, Always Fresh 

South Goldsboro Street 
Dial 2414 Wilson, N. C. 










- 






COMPLIMENTS 

OF 

DR. PEPPER BOTTLING 
COMPANY 

"Three Good Times to Enjoy Life More, 
10 — 2 — and 4 o'clock" 
















FLOWERS 

For All Occasions 

STARR THE FLORIST 

Dial 2108 























to the 

f-^roPeddionat V II ten 

•/ 

1/1/ i Id on 











B» 



■10 



THE 



IN THIS ANNUAL 
WERE MADE By 



Daniel and Smith 
Studio 

134 Fay ette-Oille Street 



ifihi 



FINE PORTRAITS 
PROMPT SERVICE 



Largest College Annual 
Photographers In The South 



E>.. 



■ it out 



i.0 



$ 

I* 

» 

A 

n 

■» 



lit 

s- 

If 
n 



THIS BOOK D E S I G n E'D A n D PR 



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L^omsun 



T E D B 1 


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p r i n t i n o c o m p a ny TV n a s h v i lie 




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